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Storm of the Month Webinars Coming Soon!

For a short time only, WDTD will be producing two Storm of the Month webinars on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of each month. Learn more about the next webinar topic below.

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Web-Based Training Release Dates

Warning Decision Training Division

Office of Chief Learning Officer

Warning Decision Storm of the Month Webinars

 

Introduction

 

WDTD is pleased to announce a special limited series of our "Storm of the Month" (SOTM) webinars! We decided to revitalize the SOTM series in order to meet the needs of our teleworking NWS staff, especially those in field offices. Even so, employees who are still working operational shifts are obviously welcome to participate, at the discretion of your local management. To make sure all employees have access to the content, these webinars will be recorded and posted on the WDTD YouTube page.

Through the end of the COVID-19 teleworking period, we will host SOTM webinars every second and fourth Wednesdays of the month. NOAA and NOAA-affiliated*** employees may register using this form.

Always feel free to contact us with questions, comments, or concerns at nws.wdtd.sotm@noaa.gov. We are excited to offer the SOTM series for you during this time, and we hope you look forward to attending!

***PLEASE NOTE: Due to limited slots to call in, the live meetings are only open to NOAA employees.

Current SOTM Webinar Details

A Preliminary Overview of the July 19-20, 2019 Blowdown and Tornadic QLCS Episodes Over Northeast Wisconsin

9/9/2020 12 pm CDT

Gene Brusky (Science and Operations Officer), WFO Green Bay

Image of MRMS FLASH v.12

Within an 18 hour period, two damaging Quasi-Linear Convective Systems (QLCS) raced across the northern half of Wisconsin at speeds of 27-31 m/s (60-70 mph). The first QLCS evolved during the evening of July 19 over northern Wisconsin. It was characterized by an intense line surge and bookend vortex that produced primarily straight-line wind damage along an approximate 80 km long and 2-4 km wide swath, destroying nearly 300,000 acres of forest. Estimated maximum surface wind gusts were likely in excess of 53 m/s (120 mph). The second QLCS evolved the following morning over east central Wisconsin and was also characterized by an intense line surge and bookend vortex. However, this second QLCS was primarily accompanied by several damaging (EF1) mesovortex tornadoes. This presentation will briefly address some of the similarities and differences between these two events, with respect to the NSE and radar evolution. Preliminary radar analysis suggests that storm-scale interactions appeared to play an important role in initiating the intense line surges observed in both events. A brief description of the blowdown damage characteristics will also be provided using high-resolution satellite imagery and aerial survey information.

Storm of the Month Webinar Archive

2020 Storm of the Month Limited Series:

These recorded sessions will be posted on the WDTD YouTube page one week after each webinar. A LMS object has also been created for each session, if tracking attendance is desired.

2014-2017 Storm of the Month Series:

  • November 2014: A Local Approach to Improving Warning Performance
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • December 2014: An Overview of Impact Based Warnings Implementation
    Web Version
  • February 2015: Nowcasting an Historic Ice Storm in the Carolinas
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • March 2015: A Subtle but High Impact Winter Weather Event: The 70-Car Pileup in Worcester, MA on December 1, 2013
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • April 2015: The Relationship Between Tornadic Debris Signature Height and Tornado Intensity Operations Case - April 28, 2014
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • May 2015: The Numbers Don't Tell the Whole Story: Messaging Not Optimal, Yet the Storms "Verified"
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • June 2015: The ZDR Arch:  A Signature to Help Diagnose Damaging Winds Reaching the Surface in Severe Bow Echoes
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • July 2015: The Challenges of Communicating Multiple Hazards: Tornadoes and Flash Flooding in the Oklahoma City metro on May 31, 2013 and May 6, 2015
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • August 2015: A Rare Severe Weather and Tornado Event in Central New York and Northeast Pennsylvania: July 8, 2014
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • September 2015: Urban Flash Emergency in Houston, TX - Memorial Day 2015
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • October 2015: The Blanco at Wimberley 2015: New Directions in Flash Flood Prediction and Preparedness
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • November 2015: Managing the “Winter Blitz” of 2015
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • December 2015: Framing the Message for Extreme Weather Events
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • January 2016: The October 2013 Shutdown Blizzard
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • February 2016: SPC Study on Tornadic Supercell Probability and Tornado Intensity Estimation
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • March 2016: A New Perspective on Damage Surveys: Lessons on Public Response, Grief and Triumph
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • April 2016: The Moore, Oklahoma, Tornado on 25 March 2015: Storm-Scale Interactions and Tornadogenesis
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • May 2016: Enhancing Severe Weather Warning Decisions with Total Lightning Data
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • June 2016: The Benefit of After Action Reviews on Operational Performance
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • July 2016: Predicting Severe Winds in Difficult Terrain: West-central Montana Bow Echo Aug 10, 2015
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • August 2016: A High-Resolution Aerial Survey and Radar Analysis of QLCS Damage Paths from 31 August 2014
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • September 2016: Storm-Scale R2O: Application of Recent Tornadogenesis Research in the WFO Warning Process
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • October 2016:We're Going Into Our Shelters Now
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • November 2016: Communicating Anomalies: Forecasting an Event that has Never Happened
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • December 2016: “Living on the Edge:” Communicating Uncertainty for the January 23-24, 2016 Blizzard in Southern New England
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • January 2017: Strategies for Managing a Difficult Combination: Mixed Precipitation, Flooding, and It's a Holiday Weekend
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • February 2017: The February 25, 2013 West Texas Blizzard: A Coming of Age for One Young Forecaster
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • March 2017: Use of the NCAR Ensemble CAM in Setting Expectations for a Significant Severe Weather Event
    Web Version | LMS Version
  • April 2017: By the Time You Read This, It Will Be Flooding Again in Texas
    Web Version | LMS Version

Feedback

WDTD welcomes your feedback on this series of webinars and how well they supported your understanding of WOC materials. Please send us your comments at the following e-mail address:

Storm of the Month Help List e-mail address